Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

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Post Race and Sleeping

Photo by Whitney McLaren

Photo by Whitney McLaren

I apologize for the radio silence, but phew, we’ve been rocking and rolling! When finishing in Nome, you often have to wait at least a couple days until the banquet. Sleeping, relaxing, eating. While I have enjoyed skipping out on the normal banquet hubbub, I did miss the forced relaxation. This year, we finished in the morning. We had breakfast with our dropped dog crew (Tyler and Kelsey), then immediately drove home to Two Rivers. The next day I relaxed inside and hung with the dogs. But that was it. The following day we jumped into tours and catching up on every day life. To be honest, I haven’t even had time to really think about the race beyond watching a couple videos. Occasionally, little snippets of moments come flooding back, but honestly, I’ve had to focus on the next task at hand. I’d say that the dogs have rebounded faster than me. As I type, I’m watching out the window as they body slam each other, chew on their houses, dig in the snow, and wonder why we went from running hundreds of miles to only doing 10-15. I definitely feel a little dog guilt, but luckily, they’re headed out for an expedition on the Denali Highway starting...


Photo by Whitney McLaren

Photo by Whitney McLaren

I apologize for the radio silence, but phew, we’ve been rocking and rolling! When finishing in Nome, you often have to wait at least a couple days until the banquet. Sleeping, relaxing, eating. While I have enjoyed skipping out on the normal banquet hubbub, I did miss the forced relaxation. This year, we finished in the morning. We had breakfast with our dropped dog crew (Tyler and Kelsey), then immediately drove home to Two Rivers. The next day I relaxed inside and hung with the dogs. But that was it. The following day we jumped into tours and catching up on every day life. To be honest, I haven’t even had time to really think about the race beyond watching a couple videos. Occasionally, little snippets of moments come flooding back, but honestly, I’ve had to focus on the next task at hand. I’d say that the dogs have rebounded faster than me. As I type, I’m watching out the window as they body slam each other, chew on their houses, dig in the snow, and wonder why we went from running hundreds of miles to only doing 10-15. I definitely feel a little dog guilt, but luckily, they’re headed out for an expedition on the Denali Highway starting Monday. That should could them happy!

All that being said, I do plan to share stories and write a dog recap. It just might take me a few weeks, so thank you ahead of time for your patience! Each night as I crawl into bed, I do think about how I want to write about napping on the Iditarod. How if it’s cold, I would crawl in my sleeping bag with all my clothes and boots on. I typically lie on my chest and one hip, curling my arms underneath my body and cocooning my head in both my parka ruff and sleeping bag. I would try to make the perfect air hole that allowed oxygen into my cave, but not so much cold air that my nose got cold. But when sleeping in a warm cabin, like Skwentna or Iditarod, woooeee! Those were moments of paradise. I’d lie flat on my back, one arm outstretched over my head, soaking in the warmth as if I was in a lawn chair on the beach. I can’t normally sleep on my back, but in the middle of the race in a hot cabin, for whatever reason, it was my favorite. There are few times in my life when falling asleep has felt as glorious as napping in a hot cabin on a thousand mile race.

Another sleeping story- it was near the end of the race. I had been traveling more or less with Paige since Nikolai (inbound). We ran though the middle of the night, picked up supplies in Rainy Pass, and then mushed a bit farther until we pulled over to camp on the side of the trail. We had our alarms set for a 3:50 AM wake up call. As the alarm sounded, I started pulling myself out of my cocoon of warmth. Paige was nearby, and I heard her say, “Let’s stay in the sleeping bag just 10 more minutes”. RED FLAG. Never ever give yourself just a few more minutes of sleep. That is a slippery, slippery slope. But Paige typically beats me in a thousand mile race, so I thought, what could be the harm? Forty minutes later, I jump out of the sleeping bag and say- “PAIGE! We have to get up!!” She crawls out of her sleeping bag and says, “Let’s just go home. I’m cold. This isn’t fun anymore.” To which I replied, “Paige, we can’t go home. We’re on a race.” She gives me a quizzical look and says, “we are?” At this point, I thought she was just teasing. She asks, “Which race are we on?” “We’re on the Iditarod, Paige!” Paige responds, “huh, where are we?” “We’re on our way to Skwentna,” I say. She looks extra confused now, which is understandable since it is strange to be returning to Skwentna. She says, “ok…so…what should I do now?” “Well,” I say, “let’s starting packing up to leave and get to the finish!” Shortly after this conversation, Paige has cleared out the cobwebs, and she was quickly prepping the team to leave. But for the rest of the race, this memory brought us lots of laughs!


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