Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

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Iditarod Videos

After resting for a couple days, we’ve jumped back into the normal routine of tours, training runs, and playing with puppies! Over the next couple weeks, I’ll upload videos from different sections of the trail.

One of my favorite sections was the Farewell Burn, specifically on the return route. However, on the outbound, that section of trail was my least favorite. When heading outbound, we hit the burn at night. It was windy, causing the dead trees to sway and groan. The Burn is notorious for its bare ground (all the snow is blown away), and the way out was no exception. We skidded across frozen dirt and tundra with the wind whipping up the dirt particles. As I opened my mouth, panting from the effort of running next to the sled up the steep inclines (sleds don’t slide very well on dirt), I would swallow a cloud of dust, leaving a gritty dry feeling in my mouth. A layer of dirt and grime covered everything- the sled bag, the dog booties, their tongues, my face. Most mushers camp at the only open water of Tin Creek, otherwise you’re scraping the meager layer of snow off the ground to try and make water for the team. So needless to say, when we left the Burn behind on the...


After resting for a couple days, we’ve jumped back into the normal routine of tours, training runs, and playing with puppies! Over the next couple weeks, I’ll upload videos from different sections of the trail.

One of my favorite sections was the Farewell Burn, specifically on the return route. However, on the outbound, that section of trail was my least favorite. When heading outbound, we hit the burn at night. It was windy, causing the dead trees to sway and groan. The Burn is notorious for its bare ground (all the snow is blown away), and the way out was no exception. We skidded across frozen dirt and tundra with the wind whipping up the dirt particles. As I opened my mouth, panting from the effort of running next to the sled up the steep inclines (sleds don’t slide very well on dirt), I would swallow a cloud of dust, leaving a gritty dry feeling in my mouth. A layer of dirt and grime covered everything- the sled bag, the dog booties, their tongues, my face. Most mushers camp at the only open water of Tin Creek, otherwise you’re scraping the meager layer of snow off the ground to try and make water for the team. So needless to say, when we left the Burn behind on the outbound direction, I was not looking forward to having to return back through that wasteland.

Little did I know, the area received a fresh layer of snow during the interim, so when we returned through the Farewell Burn, it was spectacular! Since it was daylight, I was able to see the towering mountains on all sides. The once spooky trees adopted a Dr. Seuss-like quality rather than a Nightmare Before Christmas vibe. The dogs sailed across the fresh snow, so no more dust and dirt in the face for us! Plus, we saw buffalo!

A bit about Alaska Bison:

In Alaska, there are two different subspecies of bison: wood bison and plains bison. Wood bison are slightly larger and are naturally occurring in Alaska; whereas the plains bison were established in 1928 near Delta Junction.

There are four herds of plains bison totaling about 900 animals. According to Alaska Fish and Game, “various forms of bison existed in Alaska for several hundred thousand years; until relatively recent times, bison were one of the most abundant large animals on the landscape. Alaska’s existing wild plains bison are descendants of animals that were transplanted from Montana in 1928 to Delta Junction. Transplants have created additional herds at Copper Rivers, Chitina River, and Farewell.” The bison that we saw were part of the Farewell herd.

And did I mention we were treated to a SPECTACULAR sunrise?


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