Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

Outdoor dog kennel

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White Mountains Camp by Mandy

“Did you happen to grab the ganglines?”

I glance over and meet Ryne’s eyes for the last second of hopefulness that we didn’t forget one of the most crucial pieces of gear.

You see, we’re a couple of miles down Chena Hot Springs Road on our way to the White Mountains for a two day mushing trip. Our first run is an easy 40 miles so we had a slow morning of packing and free-running the puppy litters. Even so, it’s afternoon already and we want snacks at the gas station, not a trip back to the kennel.

“No, I didn’t.”

Oh, well. It’s only a minor detour before we’re back on the road and bellies happy with food. Just 2 mushers, 19 dogs, and 1 truck.

The parking lot is filling up but the spot next to the trail head is clear. We pull in, slip on warmer clothes, and prep the sleds. Soon after, the dogs are out and dressed for the occasion! The other weekenders curiously watch as they arrange their own snow machines, hiking backpacks, firewood, etc.

We pause at the exit waiting for a family to pass by before taking off.

The little kid loudly asks his parent, “Why does she have so many dogs?” A single pet dog is dragged behind them with eyes spread wide at our pack.

Once they’re out of ear shot,...


“Did you happen to grab the ganglines?”

I glance over and meet Ryne’s eyes for the last second of hopefulness that we didn’t forget one of the most crucial pieces of gear.

You see, we’re a couple of miles down Chena Hot Springs Road on our way to the White Mountains for a two day mushing trip. Our first run is an easy 40 miles so we had a slow morning of packing and free-running the puppy litters. Even so, it’s afternoon already and we want snacks at the gas station, not a trip back to the kennel.

“No, I didn’t.”

Oh, well. It’s only a minor detour before we’re back on the road and bellies happy with food. Just 2 mushers, 19 dogs, and 1 truck.

The parking lot is filling up but the spot next to the trail head is clear. We pull in, slip on warmer clothes, and prep the sleds. Soon after, the dogs are out and dressed for the occasion! The other weekenders curiously watch as they arrange their own snow machines, hiking backpacks, firewood, etc.

We pause at the exit waiting for a family to pass by before taking off.

The little kid loudly asks his parent, “Why does she have so many dogs?” A single pet dog is dragged behind them with eyes spread wide at our pack.

Once they’re out of ear shot, Ryne turns to me; “Why doesn’t he have more dogs?” She gives the dogs the okay.

The sunset waves us off and I get my first peeks of the mountains through the sporadic gaps in Spruce trees. The team is loving new trails.

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Night comes quickly and it’s a pleasant run to the cabin. I spend moments with my headlamp off to take in the stars and hear the steadiness of dog feet against the silence of an Alaskan night.

Then we start hitting overflow.

The dogs are doing their best but it’s difficult to grip the ice when wearing booties. We slow down to make it easier on them but it’s hard to tell when the overflow will end—headlamps only reach so far. Ryne knows we’re super close to the cabin though, our end point for the day, so we push on.

(Below video is from the next day when we tackle overflown in the daylight and without booties on)

Reaching the cabin, we have to maneuver around until finding spots for both dog teams to fit. The evening routine begins with melting snow for the dogs’ dinners and ends with Ryne and I tucked into sleeping bags on the cabin’s wooden platforms.

Or at least, we think.

Most of the adult dogs curled up on their straw piles and went swiftly into dreamland. But not one trouble maker. We keep hearing play noises and a few growls—Ryne gets up to yell Quiet and try to catch the culprit but dogs are good at stopping to the sound of a door opening. This repeats a few times until we hear a dog on the porch!

Ryne simply opens the door, let’s in the now loose Faff, and closes it. Problem solved.

Our goal of this trip is not strictly training—we slept the entire night—but to experience the Whites and getting a longer run of 60 miles on new trails. We wait for sunlight and look forward to seeing the landscape in the new light.

And the Whites don’t disappoint! I appreciate the variety of terrain from the overflown rivers, deep forests, and vacant ridge lines; the rise and fall of the sun along its arc. But mostly, I cherish the dogs and what they share with me.

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