Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

Outdoor dog kennel

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Rosebud Adventure

Recently, the whole human crew (Kalyn, Mandy, Derek, and I) took a day adventure up to Rosebud summit. Accompanied by three dog teams, one snowmachine, and one crazy Griffon (Sasha) we climbed up to Rosebud, searching for caribou along the way.

The Fortymile Caribou

The Fortymile Caribou herd travels throughout eastern, Interior Alaska and crosses into Canada. During last year’s Quest, I shared videos of the dogs chasing caribou down the Yukon River, as the strange critters came hurtling right at the dog team (or in the video I joked it was because of my newfound ability to call in caribou after listening to our pet reindeer). See the video below. Portions of that same herd are now on the other end of the Yukon Quest trail, near Two Rivers and Rosebud Summit.

The Fortymile Caribou herd is one of the most important resources for many First Nations and Native Alaskan communities. In the early 1900s, it was one of the largest herds in the world and had a far-reaching habitat as shown by the graphic below. The herd has varied in size over the past 100 years with its peak in the early 1920s of 500,000+ animals to a low of an estimated 5000 in 1973. Biologists believe the changes in...


Recently, the whole human crew (Kalyn, Mandy, Derek, and I) took a day adventure up to Rosebud summit. Accompanied by three dog teams, one snowmachine, and one crazy Griffon (Sasha) we climbed up to Rosebud, searching for caribou along the way.

The Fortymile Caribou

The Fortymile Caribou herd travels throughout eastern, Interior Alaska and crosses into Canada. During last year’s Quest, I shared videos of the dogs chasing caribou down the Yukon River, as the strange critters came hurtling right at the dog team (or in the video I joked it was because of my newfound ability to call in caribou after listening to our pet reindeer). See the video below. Portions of that same herd are now on the other end of the Yukon Quest trail, near Two Rivers and Rosebud Summit.

The Fortymile Caribou herd is one of the most important resources for many First Nations and Native Alaskan communities. In the early 1900s, it was one of the largest herds in the world and had a far-reaching habitat as shown by the graphic below. The herd has varied in size over the past 100 years with its peak in the early 1920s of 500,000+ animals to a low of an estimated 5000 in 1973. Biologists believe the changes in size are due to reduced nutrition from overgrazing, predation from wolves, and excessive harvest of caribou by humans (more roads made for easier harvesting combined with incorrect population estimates). With the herd at abysmal numbers, Alaskan and Yukon officials worked together to better manage the herd. By 2002, the herd had grown in size to 46,000 and for the first time in fifty years, the herd crossed the Yukon River by the Fortymile River, once again expanding its range into Canada. In 2017, the population reached almost 80,000 animals; however, biologists believe this is likely the herd’s peak based on current environmental conditions. In an effort to reduce long-term impacts to the environment from overgrazing, Alaska Fish and Game has increased the harvest quota for this year. Hunters must submit the lower jaw to ADF&G so biologists can reassess the herd’s nutritional condition.

Fortymile historic range.jpg
bou herds 2017 poster relief without sizes.jpg

Before the word got out that the herd was so close to Chena Hot Springs Road, we decided to try our luck hunting by running the dogs up to Rosebud. I would call it a 80% mushing trip, 20% hunting trip. While we would be opportunistic should the caribou cross our path, we were more interested in just getting outside, mushing with the dogs, and seeing Rosebud in the daylight. I’ve mushed this section of the Yukon Quest trail SEVEN times and never once seen it in the daylight!

Smoky and Etta

Smoky and Etta

Climbing UP!

Climbing UP!

Goblin and Bull leading Kalyn up to the saddle.

Goblin and Bull leading Kalyn up to the saddle.

As I was looking for the video of running with the caribou during the 2020 Quest, I passed over this Rosebud view from the plane. So I guess I have seen it in the daylight! Ha!

The caribou stayed just out of reach during our mushing adventure, so we didn’t bring any meat home for the freezer, but wouldn’t you know, we had to slam on the brakes as a couple caribou crossed the road on our way home! More than anything, I love seeing all the tracks and sign left by the caribou. I’m not a biologist, but it seems like life and diversity follow the caribou wherever they go. Whether we’re in the Brooks Range with the Porcupine Herd or in Two Rivers with the Fortymile Herd, there is SO MUCH LIFE. In addition to the caribou tracks, wolf, lynx, fox, and moose tracks crisscossed the trail. And for a few moments, as we held onto our sleds behind beautiful huskies, our faces wrapped in fur of wolf and wolverine, our hands toasty inside mitts made of beaver fur, smelling the musky odor of caribou hiding in the black spruce, I can imagine myself living in a bygone era, at one with nature, traversing the Arctic.

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DISCLAIMER- I tried to get all this info from reputable sources (government sites and research papers). That being said, I am not an expert on the Fortymile Herd. This info was researched to the best of my ability, but I’m just a girl blogging about things I like.


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