Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

Outdoor dog kennel

If you are looking for the toughest dog kennel, the safest dog kennel, modular dog kennel panels, a backyard dog run or a durable, galvanized dog kennel for your facility, then you are in the right place!

It's Late August?

Wowza. And just like that it’s late August! Where did the time go? The puppies have been growing. The adult dogs lounging. The reindeer eating and pooping. I’ve been helping a neighbor build houses. Liz has been doing her doctorate projects remotely from the kennel. Kalyn has been working fire dispatch in the Lower 48. Derek has been doing fire projects in the Lower 48. And the summer zipped by! Below are some of the happenings in the past few weeks.

Derek and I managed to take a sheep hunting vacation! Since Derek and I have opposite “busy seasons”, we don’t often get to spend time together. The past few years, sheep hunting has been one of the few times we step away, disconnect, and spend time together. I have yet to actually harvest a sheep (though I hike a long ways and try really hard!), but the beauty of the mountains and the trip itself always make it worthwhile regardless of the outcome. Derek, on the other hand, is almost always successful at harvesting a sheep. I guess I have a few things to learn yet.

Game trails up the mountainsides.

Game trails up the mountainsides.

One of my favorite parts of being in the Brooks Range is its vast, wild...


Wowza. And just like that it’s late August! Where did the time go? The puppies have been growing. The adult dogs lounging. The reindeer eating and pooping. I’ve been helping a neighbor build houses. Liz has been doing her doctorate projects remotely from the kennel. Kalyn has been working fire dispatch in the Lower 48. Derek has been doing fire projects in the Lower 48. And the summer zipped by! Below are some of the happenings in the past few weeks.

Derek and I managed to take a sheep hunting vacation! Since Derek and I have opposite “busy seasons”, we don’t often get to spend time together. The past few years, sheep hunting has been one of the few times we step away, disconnect, and spend time together. I have yet to actually harvest a sheep (though I hike a long ways and try really hard!), but the beauty of the mountains and the trip itself always make it worthwhile regardless of the outcome. Derek, on the other hand, is almost always successful at harvesting a sheep. I guess I have a few things to learn yet.

Game trails up the mountainsides.

Game trails up the mountainsides.

One of my favorite parts of being in the Brooks Range is its vast, wild nature. There are no established trails. Growing up in Colorado, we often followed hiking trails created and maintained by trail crews. In the Brooks Range, we follow animal trails or blaze our own. Trails up steep scree fields give the appearance that mountains have veins. Oftentimes we’re walking in the footprints of wolves, moose, bear, and caribou. Caribou, moose, and Dall sheep antlers and horns are scattered throughout the valleys. For moose and caribou, they shed their antlers every year. For the Dall sheep, finding their horns means they were a meal for a wolf or bear. Birds of prey circle above us and battle it out in the sky. Ground squirrels dart across dry creek beds. Sometimes we find an area that is freshly dug up, most likely from a bear trying to find the ground squirrel in their maze of tunnels. Blueberries cover the landscape and are added to our peanut butter and tortillas to make a PB&J.

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Here’s a short video with views from our trip. A big thank you to Liz for watching the Ryno crew while I was away for a few days!

The puppies have been growing SO FAST. I know I say that every time, but they really do. Dracula’s pups are now eight weeks old. Four will be staying at Ryno Kennel, the others will be going to various kennels and friends. Shaynee and Jeremy of Howling Ridge Kennel picked up their two new additions last night!

Beesley and Big Tuna playing the grass.

Beesley and Big Tuna playing the grass.

Havarti sitting pretty.

Havarti sitting pretty.

Tilly and Umpqua joining Shaynee and Jeremy at Howling Ridge Kennel.

Tilly and Umpqua joining Shaynee and Jeremy at Howling Ridge Kennel.

Puppy socialization.

Puppy socialization.


Tank/Captain Kirk?

Tank/Captain Kirk?

Our reindeer herd has grown! What?! Yeah! We’re still deciding his name, but we’ve narrowed it down to Tank or Captain Kirk. Tank/Captain Kirk is the future bull of the herd. Both Sailor and Pilot are steers, so Tank/Captain Kirk joined the herd to hopefully keep it growing. I get a lot of questions about why reindeer. And truthfully, it’s a very fair question. For our herd, their primary job will be tourism. So basically be nice, eat snacks from guests, show off some tricks, and hopefully* pull a cart or sleigh. Beyond tourism, reindeer are the ultimate Arctic animal. Here are some interesting reindeer and caribou facts I’ve compiled:

While they might resemble their cousins the caribou, they are different subspecies. There are approximately 55 different species and subspecies of reindeer and caribou across the world with four subspecies of caribou in North America.
Caribou Rangifer tarandus granti
Caribou play an important role in Alaska both culturally and environmentally. There are approximately 750,000 wild caribou in Alaska separated into 31 different herds. The Porcupine Caribou Herd boasts one of the longest documented land migrations of any terrestrial mammal, sometimes exceeding 3000 miles! Due to the remoteness of Alaska and northern Canada, North America is one of the few areas where large migrations still occur unobstructed by humans (although this is rapidly changing). Caribou are browsers, eating mostly willows, flowering tundra plants, sedges, and mushrooms in the summer and lichens (reindeer moss), dried sedges, and small shrubs in the fall and winter.

Reindeer Rangifer tarandus tarandus
Reindeer domestication began almost 3,000 years ago in Russia. Most of the reindeer in North America are descendants of herds from Siberia brought to Alaska in the late 1800s. Reindeer are typically stockier and smaller than their caribou cousins and have less of an urge to migrate. They enjoy similar foods to caribou and are also fed specialized pellets comprised of barley, oats, alfalfa, soybean, vitamins and minerals.

Similarities
Both male and female caribou and reindeer grow antlers. The males grow large, thick antlers, whereas females grow small, thin antlers. Males typically shed their antlers shortly after the fall breeding season while females shed theirs after giving birth in the spring; however, it is not uncommon for there to be variations. Caribou and reindeer have hooves that act like snow shovels, allowing them to dig through the snow. Their coats are comprised of fur with a hollow core, enhancing insulation and making them good swimmers. Their nasal cavity is filled with cartilaginous structures so that cold inhaled air passes over the warm mucosal membrane and is heated to body temperature before reaching the lungs. They can eat snow for hydration in the winter, so a water source isn’t necessary.

Loaded up on winter straw for the reindeer!

Loaded up on winter straw for the reindeer!


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