Kennel Club
Kennel Club #BanShockCollars campaign set to be won in England
The Kennel Club is delighted that, following a meeting with Rt Hon Michael Gove and Ross Thomson MP just last week, it is understood that a ban on both the sale and use of shock collars is to be announced across the UK shortly, following a consultation period on the terms of such a ban, including a total import ban and a possible amnesty.
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Five Hero Dogs
Five Hero Dogs Named as Finalists in hero dog awards
Judges from the Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, have selected five inspiring finalists to go forward for the public vote, with the winner being announced in the Genting Arena at the Birmingham NEC on the final day of Crufts, the world’s greatest dog show, on Sunday 11th March. These five dog heroes are just some of the dogs celebrated at the show for the ways that they enrich our lives.
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New partner
The Kennel Club announce Purina PRO Plan as their new partner in pet nutrition
Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are delighted to be working with Purina PRO Plan who share many of the same beliefs as the Kennel Club in terms of responsible dog breeding through the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder Scheme and the important role that our canine companions play in our society.
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Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
Foreign Secretary backs call to ban shock collars
In a video posted on Ross Thomson MP’s twitter account, the Foreign Secretary states: “I am absolutely shocked to discover that electric collars are being used on dogs as utensils of discipline and education. There are far better ways of training your dog. Just as you don’t need to cane children anymore, we’ve moved on from that – let’s move on from electric shock dog collars.”
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Kennel Club welcomes consultation
Kennel Club welcomes consultation on third-party puppy sale ban
The Kennel Club, whose own regulations explicitly ban the sale of puppies to third parties, has long called for an end to the sale of puppies in pet shops and by other third party retailers, as puppy farmers often use such outlets to sell their pups to unsuspecting members of the public who never see the terrible conditions that the pups were raised in.
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Say bonjour
Say bonjour to the UK’s newest pedigree dog – the Barbet
Following the ‘entente chaleureuse’ established between Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron at last week’s summit in London, Anglo-French relations in the world of dogs also look set to become even more cordial after official recognition of an ancient French breed in the UK.
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  • Kennel Club
  • Five Hero Dogs
  • New partner
  • Foreign Secretary backs call to ban
  • Kennel Club welcomes consultation
  • Say bonjour

Outdoor dog kennel

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Time for Change

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I’ve always loved the outdoors. Some of my favorite early memories are playing with my brothers, cousins, and family at Yeilding Lake in Birmingham, Alabama. Launching off the rope swing. Catching bass. Learning to water ski. Skidding around corners on inner tubes pulled behind a jet boat. Catching frogs and turtles, running from snakes. Later on, I remember our backpacking trips in Colorado. My mom playing army with us to keep us moving down the trail. My dad teaching me to fish. Singing “the ants go marching” as we charged through afternoon storms in the mountains. In high school, my brother, two friends and I spent a summer hiking the entire 486-mile Colorado Trail. We were supported by our family and friends who resupplied us every week or so. I was taught to ski at a young age, both downhill and cross-country. Our garage was filled with outdoor gear, and I was encouraged by friends, family, the media, my community- literally everyone- to go outside. Be adventurous. So when people ask me how I got into the sport of mushing and pursued my dreams, I can look back on all those memories and think- how could I have not? I was surrounded by opportunity and support. Even today,...


ryne hike.jpg

I’ve always loved the outdoors. Some of my favorite early memories are playing with my brothers, cousins, and family at Yeilding Lake in Birmingham, Alabama. Launching off the rope swing. Catching bass. Learning to water ski. Skidding around corners on inner tubes pulled behind a jet boat. Catching frogs and turtles, running from snakes. Later on, I remember our backpacking trips in Colorado. My mom playing army with us to keep us moving down the trail. My dad teaching me to fish. Singing “the ants go marching” as we charged through afternoon storms in the mountains. In high school, my brother, two friends and I spent a summer hiking the entire 486-mile Colorado Trail. We were supported by our family and friends who resupplied us every week or so. I was taught to ski at a young age, both downhill and cross-country. Our garage was filled with outdoor gear, and I was encouraged by friends, family, the media, my community- literally everyone- to go outside. Be adventurous. So when people ask me how I got into the sport of mushing and pursued my dreams, I can look back on all those memories and think- how could I have not? I was surrounded by opportunity and support. Even today, generous people have sent donations during this pandemic helping us through this challenging time. And that’s not to say this lifestyle doesn’t require hard work, but there were/are role models, family, and friends along the way to help open doors and make my path easier.

But I realize that’s not the case for everyone. There are many people in this world who don’t have the same level of support. Who don’t see people who look like them in the media doing adventurous activities. Who don’t have the same opportunities. The outdoor community has little to no diversity. And in case you haven’t caught on yet, I’m trying to talk about racism. And truth be told, I’m not very good at it. While there is outwardly confrontational racism, there’s also more subtle ways. Access to opportunities. The subtle ques that society gives to tell you what you can or cannot do, what you can or cannot be. If you google search rock climbers, mountaineers, mushers, outdoor equipment ads, you’ll see a disturbing lack of diversity. We want to help change that. While it might not be much, Ryno Kennel will donate all the proceeds (less shipping) from the sale of our merchandise to the national non-profit: Outdoor Afro. We want to help diversify the face of outdoor adventure.

https://outdoorafro.com/about/

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As described on their website, “Outdoor Afro has become the nation’s leading, cutting edge network that celebrates and inspires Black connections and leadership in nature. We help people take better care of themselves, our communities, and our planet! Outdoor Afro is a national non-profit organization with leadership networks around the country. With nearly 80 leaders in 30 states from around the country, we connect thousands of people to outdoor experiences, who are changing the face of conservation. So come out in nature with us, or be a partner to help us grow our work so that we can help lead the way for inclusion in outdoor recreation, nature, and conservation for all!”

We know it’s a small start, but we hope to be a part of the change. So hop on over to our Gear Page and buy some Ryno Kennel Gear!

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